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dc.contributor.advisorSchumacher, Gerald T.
dc.creatorAnderson, Jenifer Kirby
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-25T19:05:50Z
dc.date.available2018-06-25T19:05:50Z
dc.date.created2018-05
dc.date.issued2018-05-01
dc.date.submittedMay 2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10657.1/1006
dc.description.abstractHigh-stakes testing has been the dominant method for holding schools accountable since the implementation of No Child Left Behind (NCLB) in 2002. The Every Student Succeeds Act, enacted in 2015, continues to build on accountability policies created by NCLB to ensure that all students receive a quality education. This sustained focus on accountability makes it evident that states will continue to implement high-stakes accountability measures to ensure that every effort is being made to improve student achievement. This study examined the Student Success Initiative (SSI), a Texas high-stakes accountability measure that required students to go through accelerated instruction after failing to meet passing standards on the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR). The purpose of this study was to examine two models of accelerated instruction provided in a summer school program through SSI to determine which model had the greatest impact on student achievement. This study utilized the explanatory sequential mixed methods design to examine the implementation models of accelerated instruction and each model’s impact on student achievement. Quantitative data collected consisted of scores from the second and third administrations of the Grade 8 STAAR reading exam from students who participated in accelerated instruction in the summer school program. Qualitative data was collected through face-to-face interviews with teachers who had taught accelerated instruction in the summer school program. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis determined that the amount of time a student spent in accelerated instruction and Limited English Proficient status (LEP) significantly predicted students’ ability to achieve academic growth on the third administration of the Grade 8 STAAR reading exam. In other words, the more time a student spent in accelerated instruction equated to more growth on the third administration of the Grade 8 STAAR reading exam and LEP students scored 15 points lower than their non-LEP peers. During the interviews, these findings were shared with teachers to gain a deeper understanding of the impact accelerated instruction had on students during the summer school program. Teachers shared the benefits of the accelerated instruction curriculum and identified student struggles.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.subject.lcshAcademic achievement
dc.subject.lcshReading (Secondary)
dc.titleInstruction in the Fast Lane: The Impact of Accelerated Instruction through the Student Success Initiative on Student Achievement
dc.typeDissertation
dc.date.updated2018-06-25T19:05:51Z
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Houston-Clear Lake
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Education
dc.contributor.committeeMemberLastrapes, Renee
dc.contributor.committeeMemberDivoll, Kent
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMcCarley, Troy
dc.type.materialtext
dc.creator.orcid0000-0002-3447-7347


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