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dc.contributor.advisorBrown, Suzanne
dc.creatorCrawford, Paulette
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-26T19:29:26Z
dc.date.available2019-09-26T19:29:26Z
dc.date.created2019-05
dc.date.issued2019-04-18
dc.date.submittedMay 2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10657.1/1459
dc.description.abstractLatinx students have been graduating high school and enrolling in college at lower rates than their Caucasian counterparts. Sufficient positive social capital can be beneficial in shaping Latinx students’ attitudes towards college enrollment. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential differences between AP and IB Latinx students’ perceptions of their college readiness. The study examined students’ attitudes towards attitudes toward college, academic achievement, teacher expectations and interactions, college readiness, school-wide support, guidance and counseling, and parent engagement. Data were collected from a purposive sample of high school seniors. The 143 participants were placed in three groups; students not enrolled in AP/IB courses, students enrolled in one or two AP/IB courses and students enrolled in three or more AP/IB courses. Approximately 85% of the 143 participants answered four open-ended questions and three students, one from each group participated in a focus group. The data collected from the opened ended questions and focus group were used to gain a deeper understanding of students’ perceptions of their college readiness and understanding of requirements for college enrollment. The findings of the study show that being enrolled in AP/IB courses had no effect on students’ attitudes towards college, academic achievement, teacher expectations and interactions, college readiness, school-wide support, guidance and counseling, and parent engagement. Overall students had positive attitudes towards college and school-wide support. The open-ended questions and focus group revealed that enrollment in AP/IB courses was important for college readiness and all students should be allowed to enroll in them. Students also felt that an earlier than senior year introduction to college enrollment requirements would help them to be better prepared for college.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectLatinx
dc.subjectHispanic
dc.subjectsocial capital
dc.subjectsecondary education
dc.subjectunderrepresented
dc.subjectparent influence, guidance counseling, teacher expectations
dc.titleThe Impact of Social Capital on Latinx Students' Attitudes Towards Secondary Education
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2019-09-26T19:29:26Z
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Houston-Clear Lake
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Education
dc.contributor.committeeMemberCarman, Carol
dc.contributor.committeeMemberOrange, Amy
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBrowning, Sandra
dc.type.materialtext


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